Personal Bankruptcy And Why It Might Be The Right Choice For You

Have you filed for bankruptcy? Did you have no other choice and now you have to live with the consequences? Now you can get an idea of how to get through life with this article. You do have options in life, you just have to explore all of them. So take a look through this article to figure out some of your options.

Don’t be afraid to apply for credit for purchases such as a new home or car just because you have a recently discharged bankruptcy. Many lenders will take your new financial situation into account. They may be more likely to loan money to someone who has no debt due to a bankruptcy than to the person with, say, 75,000 dollars in credit card debt. The fact that you have no monthly credit card payments can make you look like a better risk.

Determine which assets won’t be seized before filing for bankruptcy. Certain assets, as listed in the local bankruptcy regulations, are immune from seizure during bankruptcy. Be sure that you study this list. Make yourself aware of any assets you have that could be seized. If you don’t read this list, there is a chance that you might get nasty surprises when they take your things away.

Don’t think of bankruptcy as the ruination of your financial future. Once your bankruptcy has been discharged, you can begin to work on re-building your credit right away. By continuing to make timely monthly payments and not applying for new credit, you can significantly raise your credit score within 6 months. And, if you maintain good credit for that amount of time, you may find it possible to get approval for loans to make large purchases, such as a home or car.

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As tempting as it may be, do not run up credit cards right before filing for bankruptcy. Many times, people purchase expensive items, like jewelry, appliances and furniture right before they know they are going to file for bankruptcy. Most of the time, they are still going to be responsible for paying back this debt.

If you have filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but realize that you are unable to meet your payment obligations, you may be able to convert to a Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. To qualify for the conversion, you must never have converted your bankruptcy before and also undergo a financial evaluation. The laws surrounding this process are always changing, so be sure to talk with an attorney who can help you navigate this process.

Once you have filed for bankruptcy, do not discontinue payment on secured loans. These loans are the ones for your car or your home. Even if you are not receiving paper bills or statements on these accounts, make the regular payment on time, each month. These are likely the possessions you do not want included from the bankruptcy.

Once you determined that you want to file for bankruptcy, it is important that you figure out which kind is best for you to file. For instance, with Chapter 7 most of your debts will be relieved, and you can keep certain aspects. With Chapter 13 your debt gets reconstructed, and you are given a certain amount of time to pay it off.

Clean up your credit record after ten years. When you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy, it remains on your credit report for ten years. However, the credit bureaus are not required to remove the information. In order to get rid of the bankruptcy record, write a letter to the credit reporting agencies, along with a copy of your discharge notice. Follow this up with a phone call to make sure that they have removed the bankruptcy record.

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You can change your Chapter 13 bankruptcy payments in certain situations. While your payment amount will be set up for 3 to 5 years, if there is a change in your situation, you may be able to amend it. A decrease in income, such as, a pay cut, or a sudden increase in expenses, such as, a medical condition, may allow you to amend your monthly payments. You may be able to reduce the payment accordingly, or in some cases, suspend your payment for a certain amount of time.

Bankruptcy should not harm you for the rest of your life. Just because you have met harsh times, does not mean that there is no sign for hope. Now that you know how to live a better life while you get through your bankruptcy, you can focus on rebuilding your finances and your credit history.